ECOLOGY

GLHS

What are longshore currents?

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17 thoughts on “What are longshore currents?

  1. A long-shore current is an ocean current that moves parallel to shore. It is caused by swells sweeping into the shoreline at an angle and pushing water down the length of the beach in one direction.

  2. Longshore drift consists of the transport of sediments (generally sand but may also consist of coarser sediments such as gravels)

  3. A longshore current koves along the coast parallel. It transports sediments along the coast.

  4. A long-shore current is an ocean current that moves parallel to shore. It is caused by swells sweeping into the shoreline at an angle and pushing water down the length of the beach in one direction.

  5. A long shore current is an ocean current that moves beach material laterally due to the waves hitting the shore at an oblique angle

  6. Longshore currents transport sediment and moves parallel to the shore.

  7. Longshore currents run parallel to shore. Like offshore currents, they are considered standing currents, which means they rarely change direction if ever at all.

  8. A long-shore current is an ocean current that moves parallel to shore.

  9. A long shore current is an ocean current that moves parallel to the shore.

  10. Longshore currents are Caused by Waves going to the shoreline at an angle, And bouncing off which causes an undertow pulling parallel to the beach

  11. the process whereby beach material is gradually shifted laterally as a result of waves meeting the shore at an oblique angle

  12. A long shore current is an ocean current that moves beach material laterally due to the action of waves hitting the shore at an oblique angle

  13. A long shore current is the current that helps sediment travel

  14. Currents that move parallel to the shore are longshore currents

  15. Longshore currents are currents that move with the shoreline and not up against it.

  16. Longshore currents are currents that move parallel to the shore.

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